LUKAS Dieter's profile
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LUKAS Dieter

  • Department of Human Behavior, Ecology, and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
  • Life Sciences
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Recommendation:  1

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Areas of expertise
I investigate why populations differ in their social behaviour. I classify the extent of cooperation and competition between individuals in a wide range of populations and identify which environmental conditions lead to certain behaviours. My current research focuses on identifying whether these conditions also shape human behaviour. I am a Senior Researcher and joint leader of the Comparative Behavioral Ecology group https://www.eva.mpg.de/ecology/projects-and-research-groups/comparative-behavioral-ecology.html

Recommendation:  1

20 Mar 2023
STAGE 1
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Do Ecological Valid Stop Signals Aid Detour Performance? A Comparison of Four Bird Species

What is the role of sensory perception in cognitive task performance? An improved replication of detour performance in four different bird species

Recommended by based on reviews by 2 anonymous reviewers
The detour task, where an individual has to navigate around a see-through barrier in order to reach a goal, is one of the oldest paradigms used in animal cognition research (Kabadayi et al. 2018). While these previous tests have documented variation in the ability of animals to inhibit going straight for the visible but blocked reward, the cognitive underpinnings of this behaviour are as yet not fully understood. In the current study, Dewulf et al. (2023) propose to assess one of the specific cognitive processes that might be involved in this behaviour. Through experimental procedures, they will compare the role of signal detection in inhibitory response performance in a detour task. To assess whether variation in detection of the barrier might be linked to the ecological niche of a species, they will compare four bird species who live in different environments. Individuals from these four species were previously tested in a detour task (Regolin et al. 1994, Zucca et al. 2005), and the proposed research plan therefore also involves a partial replication of previous studies on the same issue, but improving some critical aspects.
 
The Stage 1 manuscript was evaluated over one round of in-depth review. Based on detailed responses to the reviewers' comments, the recommender judged that the manuscript met the Stage 1 criteria and therefore awarded in-principle acceptance (IPA).
 
Level of bias control achieved: Level 6. No part of the data or evidence that will be used to answer the research question yet exists and no part will be generated until after IPA. 
 
URL to the preregistered Stage 1 protocol: https://osf.io/qvxgh
 
List of eligible PCI RR-friendly journals:
 
 
References
 
Dewulf, A., Garcia-Co, C., Müller, W., Madden, J.R., Martel, A., Lens, L. & Verbruggen, F. (2023). Do Ecological Valid Stop Signals Aid Detour Performance? A Comparison of Four Bird Species. In principle acceptance of Version 2 by Peer Community in Registered Reports. https://osf.io/qvxgh
 
Kabadayi, C., Bobrowicz, K., & Osvath, M. (2018). The detour paradigm in animal cognition. Animal Cognition, 21, 21-35. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-017-1152-0
 
Regolin L, G Vallortigara, and M Zanforlin (1994). Perceptual and motivational aspects of detour behaviour in young chicks. Animal Behaviour 47, 123–131. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.1994.1014
 
Zucca P, F Antonelli, and G Vallortigara (2005). Detour behaviour in three species of birds: quails (Coturnix sp.), herring gulls (Larus cachinnans) and canaries (Serinus canaria). Animal Cognition, 8, 122–128. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-004-0243-x 
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LUKAS Dieter

  • Department of Human Behavior, Ecology, and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
  • Life Sciences
  • recommender

Recommendation:  1

Reviews:  0

Areas of expertise
I investigate why populations differ in their social behaviour. I classify the extent of cooperation and competition between individuals in a wide range of populations and identify which environmental conditions lead to certain behaviours. My current research focuses on identifying whether these conditions also shape human behaviour. I am a Senior Researcher and joint leader of the Comparative Behavioral Ecology group https://www.eva.mpg.de/ecology/projects-and-research-groups/comparative-behavioral-ecology.html