SCHWARZKOPF D. Samuel's profile
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SCHWARZKOPF D. Samuel

  • SamPenDu Lab, School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Life Sciences, Social sciences
  • recommender

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Educational and work
Sam's research uses psychophysics, functional MRI (in particular in combination with population receptive field analysis and similar encoding models), and occasional other neuroscience techniques to understand how perceptual processing works. How are sensory brain regions organised? What are the neural mechanisms through which we interpret the chaotic sensory input? How can those processes go awry in health and disease? In the broadest sense, his research seeks to better understand how the brain gives rise to our unique and subjective perception of the world around us. Originally trained as a neurophysiologist at Cardiff University (1999-2007), after completing his PhD Sam moved into the field of human neuroimaging and psychophysics (University of Birmingham, 2007-8; University College London, 2008-2018). Since 2017 he has been at the School of Optometry & Vision Science at the University of Auckland on the path to Kiwification. Website: sampendu.net Keywords: vision science, perception, illusions, population receptive fields, encoding models, psychophysics, fMRI, retinotopic mapping, sensory neuroscience
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SCHWARZKOPF D. Samuel

  • SamPenDu Lab, School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Life Sciences, Social sciences
  • recommender

Recommendations:  0

Reviews:  0

Educational and work
Sam's research uses psychophysics, functional MRI (in particular in combination with population receptive field analysis and similar encoding models), and occasional other neuroscience techniques to understand how perceptual processing works. How are sensory brain regions organised? What are the neural mechanisms through which we interpret the chaotic sensory input? How can those processes go awry in health and disease? In the broadest sense, his research seeks to better understand how the brain gives rise to our unique and subjective perception of the world around us. Originally trained as a neurophysiologist at Cardiff University (1999-2007), after completing his PhD Sam moved into the field of human neuroimaging and psychophysics (University of Birmingham, 2007-8; University College London, 2008-2018). Since 2017 he has been at the School of Optometry & Vision Science at the University of Auckland on the path to Kiwification. Website: sampendu.net Keywords: vision science, perception, illusions, population receptive fields, encoding models, psychophysics, fMRI, retinotopic mapping, sensory neuroscience